[redesigned] Painted Planter Pots

Chalkboard Painted Planter Pots | Redesigned By M

If you’ve been following my blog, you’ll know that I’ve been knee deep in gardening adventures ever since we made over our landscape. After making my own plant markers and planting the vegetables, I looked to fulfill another goal: tending an herb garden. As I have a pretty amazing sunroom that gets a lot of sun all year round, I thought this would be a good room to keep an indoor herb garden in the winter. I’m not sure if it’ll work, but I can at least try! In order to have an indoor herb garden, I’ll need to make sure the herbs are portable, so in pots they go!

Chalkboard Painted Planter Pots | Redesigned By M

I found these pots for FREE on Craigslist. They were an awesome find! Mostly, they were in great condition. A couple came with cracks. See my post here on how I repaired them.

Chalkboard Painted Planter Pots | Redesigned By M

They were also a bit dirty, but nothing a little washing couldn’t handle!

Chalkboard Painted Planter Pots | Redesigned By M

After I cleaned up the pots, I perched them onto various risers such as toilet paper tubes, container saucers, etc. I got the idea to paint these pots with chalkboard paint from Lia Griffith. If you don’t know Lia, you must get acquainted with her because she is AH-MAY-ZING! Would I lie to you? She painted her planter pots in chalkboard and after much debate about what I wanted to do with my own terra cotta pots, I decided chalkboard would be the way to go. Seriously, go check out her site. But finish reading my post first.

Chalkboard Painted Planter Pots with watering directions | Redesigned By M

Using my fabulous new chalk markers, I labeled each pot with the name of the herb as well as watering directions. I get so forgetful on which herbs need what sort of attention! This was a very simple project. Give it a try!

Total time: It took me 45 minutes to paint eight pots. I did it outside in the blazing hot sun, so these pots dried really quick.

Total cost: A quart of chalkboard paint cost me about $10, but I only used about a quarter of the can, if that. The pots were totally free thanks to Craigslist! 

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Linking To:

52 Mantels
A Blossoming Life
A Stroll Thru Life
Adventures Of A DIY Mom
Chic On A Shoestring Decorating
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Common Ground
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Craft-O-Maniac
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Life On Lakeshore Drive
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Not Just A Housewife
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repurposed: DIY Plant Markers

DIY Plant Markers | Redesigned By M

After my vegetable beds were built (see the posts here and here for details), I set about planting some vegetables to fill the beds.  Of course, planting crops meant I needed a way to identify them so this called for a DIY project for some plant markers.  I used some items I had readily available around the house, which made these markers absolutely free and upcycled.  Ahhh… my favorite type of project!

Here are the instructions:

DIY Plant Markers - Tutorial | Redesigned By M

It was important to me to have some sort of instruction on how to harvest the plants on the marker somewhere as I won’t be the only person tending the garden.  (We also have rental tenants in our basement unit who will have access to the veggies; and don’t forget my husband gets to pick them as well!)

DIY Plant Markers | Redesigned By M

As I wanted my plant markers in pastel colors, I had to customize a couple of my own colors.  The mint green color was found at Home Depot in the mistints section, so I’m sorry I don’t have a tutorial on how to mix that color.

DIY Plant Markers - Mixing Blue Paint | Redesigned By M

Fun Fact: This blue shown here was used to paint my pantry.

DIY Plant Markers - Mixing Coral Paint | Redesigned By M

Budget Tip: The acrylic craft paints you see here were sourced from Dollar Tree.
No need to shell out big bucks for paint!

I absolutely ADORE how these markers turned out!

DIY Plant Markers | Redesigned By M

I especially love how the markers add a splash of unexpected color in an otherwise green, brown, and black space.  Makes them much easier to spot.

DIY Plant Markers | Redesigned By M

What do you think of my new plant markers made from paint stir sticks?  Do you have some fun plant markers of your own to share?  Let me know in the comments below!

Total time: It took me a total of 2.5 hours to paint about 15 markers and to mix the colors in between.  This does not include dry time.

Total cost: A gallon of the mint green paint cost $9+tax from Home Depot, of which I only used a tiny fraction.  I’ll be using this paint for other projects, so I’m not counting this into the total cost of this one.  The other paints were already in my collection and paint stir sticks are always free.  So my plant markers were all free, free, and free!  **Happy dance**

Linking to:

Living Well, Spending Less
Made In A Day
A Blossoming Life
DIY Show Off
Tatertots & Jello
Nifty Thrifty Things
52 Mantels
All Things With Purpose
The Shabby Nest
Design, Dining, & Diapers
Chic On A Shoestring Budget
I Gotta Try That
C.R.A.F.T.
Skip To My Lou
Keeping It Simple
Coastal Charm
Twigg Studios
Home Stories A to Z
Elizabeth & Co
Homework
The Blackberry Vine
The Dedicated House
Twelve O Eight
The Charm of Home

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Redesigned By M

Adventures In Building Raised Vegetable Beds (Part 2)

Rounding off the week of gardening posts with Part Two of the raised vegetable beds my husband and I built.  If you missed Part One, you can catch up here.

As we were quite exhausted from all the shopping and building on the first weekend, we had to continue this project the following weekend (aka just this weekend past).

Supplies You Might Like To Have On Hand:

Work gloves
*To handle the wire mesh and adding the soil.

Wire cutting shears

Measuring tape

Staple gun and staples

Newspapers

Stones
*To anchor the newspapers so they don’t fly off in the wind.

Wheelbarrow
*Really essential

Shovel
*To load the soil into the wheelbarrow

Trowel or some tool to level out the soil

2-rolls of hardware cloth, 36″ x 25’L, 1″ grid

Garden mix soil
*Use the formula found at this link here to figure out how much you need.

I started off the morning with laying down hardware cloth (or wire mesh screen) at the bottom of each bed.  This ensures that no pesky moles or other similar pests will dig their way into our vegetables.  We were told that our beds are high enough that this shouldn’t be a problem, but I think it’s always best to err on the safer side.  It was much easier to add the mesh at this stage than it would be after we’ve filled it with soil and plants.  Who agrees with me on this?

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Pretty much, I laid out the hardware cloth across the beds and then snipped when it was long enough.  I left extra length at the start and end of each bed so that the mesh would wrap up the vertical parts of the beds.  You may want to wear long sleeves when you do this part because that mesh bounces back and scratches your arms without any apologies!  My arm looks like I got attacked by pissed off cats.

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Here’s the hardware cloth placed at the bottom of the bed.  I had to crease the mesh where I wanted it to “fold” upwards.

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Then I cut notches into the mesh where there were studs or posts that impeded the footprint of the bed.

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After the mesh was properly laid out, I attached it to the bed with a few strategically placed staples using a staple gun.

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After the mesh was laid out, we laid down newspapers to help keep out weeds.  We don’t want no unwelcome weeds in our vegetables!

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And then the soil arrived.  Just in time!  Buuuuuut… no one told us that they’d just dump it in our back alley leaving us to pick up the mess.  Oh, did someone get the memo on that besides me?

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Good ol’ Mr. M!  He’s so handy to have around.  He hauled in countless wheelbarrows full of soil from the back alley, around the garage, and into our beds.  This was extreme backbreaking work!  No amount of photos or video could ever justify how much work this was.  I admit there were a few times that I thought to myself, “Maybe we shouldn’t have built these beds so high…”

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But in the end, all the beds got filled with fresh, earthy, warm garden mix.  And all those flaws in the construction process that I hoped would be hidden by the addition of soil definitely vanished.  Now we’re ready for planting!  That will have to be this coming weekend…. hope we have time!  I have a Photo Styling Challenge to shoot, friends visiting from out of town, and my brother-in-law’s birthday… ALL this weekend!  How am I going to fit in planting??

Total time: Oh man!  We started at 9AM and didn’t finish until 6PM, with very minimal breaks.  Hardware cloth placement took about half an hour for each bed.  Laying down the newspapers was really easy and relatively quick in the grand scheme of things.  The soil arrived at 1PM and we worked on filling the beds for practically five hours straight.

Total cost: The rolls of mesh were $41 each from Rona.  The newspapers were free as they were old papers and recycled materials.  We bought 7 cubic yards of soil when we really only needed 6.  Now we have a ton of soil leftover, which we’ve bagged up to save for future gardening projects.  The cost for soil and delivery was $280.  Add this amount to the cost from Part One and these beds have set us back $877.33.  I really hope this cost will be returned in the savings of growing our own food!

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Redesigned By M

Adventures In Building Raised Vegetable Beds (Part 1)

Over the past two weekends, Mr. M and I built a few raised vegetable beds in our backyard.  I’m writing this post mostly to document the process we underwent so I’ll have a manual (of sorts) to refer to in the future, but if this post helps anyone in the same position, then all the better!

Before doing any building, we did a ton of research into what kind of beds we wanted and how they would fit into the type of garden we wanted to keep.  In addition to the beds, we also purchased a compost bin and rain barrel from the city.  Going through this option was much cheaper than trying to buy each component ourselves, or even to DIY it.

Ultimately, we decided to maximize our backyard space with vegetable beds and we wanted to create seating around the beds as Mr. M has A TON of friends and family and there never seems to be enough chairs for everyone!

Planning

It is inherent to draw up plans for any major projects you plan to undertake.  I know that it definitely helps me to visualize it all and informs me of areas I might not have thought through.  In our case, I had to think through how we were going to support the bench seating around the beds.

I would show you the sketch I drew up, but I doodled all over it when I was calculating materials for the cut sheet, so the drawing is pretty much unreadable.

How about I paint the picture through words?  Basically, we wanted to build five beds to maximize square footage; two along the wall of the garage and three along the back fence.  Each bed would be roughly 36″ wide x 120″ long x 16-18″ high.  Yes, 10 feet long.  Big beds, I know.

Wood Selection

What type of wood is best for our vegetable garden?  We quickly crossed off pressure-treated woods from our list as we didn’t want to risk any chemical contamination in our food – no matter what the sales associate at Dick’s Lumber said.  It was better to take the safe road on this one, even if he said that research has shown there isn’t enough chemical leaching into the soil to be considered dangerous.

So we were left with a plethora of natural woods to choose from.  We definitely wanted wood that would stand the test of time, so we didn’t have to worry about replacing the beds every year.  We finally chose cedar.  Western Red Cedar, to be exact.  Cedar has wonderful outdoor properties and they’re used in all sorts of outdoor projects where wood is needed.  The downfall is that it’s a bit expensive: about twice the price of pressure-treated wood.  Like I said, we were willing to take the safe road and cough up the extra expense for this.  There are some things in life where it’s better not to cut costs.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

Here’s my husband helping the guy at Home Depot load up our little car with the wood.  We had to make two trips to get the wood as the first location didn’t have enough good selection for us to choose from.  We visited a second location to round off the amount of materials we needed.  Shopping alone took us about three hours.

Materials List:

33 – Cedar boards 2″ x 6″ x 10′
6   – Cedar posts 2″ x 2″ x 8′
250 – Deck screws for cedar #8 x 3″

Gather the Tools

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

Essential items to build raised vegetable beds:

Work gloves (we used garden gloves)
*Great to handle lumber with to avoid getting nasty splinters.

Hammer
*Mostly important for removing those stupid price tags you’ll see in the next section

Drill bit and driver bit in the right sizes for your screws

Deck screws
*We got exterior screws specifically for cedar wood so the screw colors blend in well.

Square
*To mark straight lines for your cuts

Power drill

Measuring tape

Screwdriver
*I can’t remember where I used this, if I did, but it’s always nice to have on hand – just in case.

Build It!

So we had the plans and we got the wood.  Check and check!  Now, the fun part!  Building the beds!

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

I quickly realized that before I could cut anything, I had to remove ALL these pesky tags.  Arghh!

Here was the construction plan:

We essentially constructed three giant picture frames (for lack of a better description), one at a time, stacked on top of each other.  The first frame was put into place and leveled out.  Then the second frame was constructed and laid on top of the first.  And repeated the same for the third frame.

Initially, we planned to just build the seating at the front of the bed where the pathway is and trim out the other three sides in 2×2’s so the heights were even all around.  However, during construction, we decided we wanted to add the 6″ cedar to all sides, which is why we didn’t miter any of the corners and did a bit of a shoddy job.  I tried to make adjustments as cleanly and efficiently as possible, nonetheless.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

Here’s the start of the first bed, built according to plan, but we had to modify the width of the bed to ensure that the pathway in front was a minimum of 36″ for wheelbarrow passage.  My husband is in the back leveling out the land.  What a pain in the arse that was!  It took more time to level everything out than it did to build the beds.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

I added “studs” to the front side of the bed (left side of photo) where the bench seating would be located.  I spaced them about 20-24″ apart to provide extra support for sitting.  The post in the right corner was added to keep the three levels of frames together.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

First two beds are built!  And that was all we could handle for Day One.  I’ve gotta figure out how to block that left corner so pests don’t build homes in there.  Anyone have any cool ideas?  All I can think of is to just somehow screw in a piece of wood there.

The Building Continues

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

After some lessons learned from Day One, I decided on a different design for the next set of beds on Day Two.  And as we were running out of material, after using up the 6″ cedar in the design modification to the first set of beds, we kept this second set only two high of boards, and no bench seating were added.  I will probably add them later, but for now, 20′ of seating should be plenty.  Also, I had to adjust the layout of this next set of beds due to space constraints after making dimensional modifications to the first set.

Despite all the changes, the second set of beds went in rather smoothly!  The photo above is of Mr. M leveling out the land.  Always leveling out the land.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

Here’s how the second set of beds changed in the construction.  Instead of stacking frames of wood, I used a post in the corner and screwed the long boards into that post.  I don’t think one way is easier than the other, but this one required less steps as I didn’t have to add the corner posts to the insides of the beds afterward.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

In order to maximize the use of our yard space, I added on a few inches to the 10′ boards at the back.  It’s pretty piece meal, I admit, but I figured that this add-on won’t be noticeable after the soil goes in.

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

And there we have it!  The second set of beds!

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

Here is a photo of both sets of beds.  It felt so wonderful to get this task checked off our list!  Even better to hang up the tool belt at the end of the day and sit on the bench of this bed to look out over the newly redesigned backyard space.  Oh look!  There’s even a flower beginning to bud on one of our magnolia trees!

How to build raised vegetable beds with seating | Redesigned By M

I love having magnolia trees in my backyard.  I’m starting to see why people love gardening so much.

That’s enough information for part one.  Stick around for the next post when we fill the beds.  That is definitely worth having its own post.  Trust me.

Total time: Day One – it was roughly eight hours, which included three hours of shopping time.  Day Two was completed in five hours.  Keep in mind that we spent a great deal of time in leveling out our land on both days, which we felt was extremely crucial because we added bench seating to the beds.  If your land is already level, you can expect to spend about an hour for each bed, maybe a lot less if you build smaller ones.

Total cost: The woods and screws all totalled to $515.33, including taxes.  All the materials were purchased from Home Depot.  We did do some price comparison at Dick’s Lumber and Rona.  Both places priced their 2″ x 6″ x 10′ cedar boards at roughly $2 more per board.  FYI: Home Depot sells prefabricated cedar garden beds, which are actually quite adorable!  There are two sizes.  The largest one is 24″W x 48″L.  I forget what the height is, but I’m guessing it’s about 12″.  That sells for $50 (in Canada). 

The saga continues in Adventures In Building Raised Vegetable Beds (Part 2).

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redesigned: Landscape Makeover

At the time we bought our house, the appraisal report came back with an “average” curb appeal rating.  The building exterior was a drab stucco with gray wood siding on the lower half.  The landscape was maintained, but we had let it overgrow during the two years we’ve lived here as neither Mr. M nor I know anything about gardening and landscaping.  As most of our time is spent indoors, especially in the Vancouver climate, I put all my effort in making our house into a home.  The exterior was sorely neglected.  Mr. M did what he could with weeding and mowing the grass, but the gardens needed a major redesign.  It was my goal this year to get that under control and we spent the last month pulling it all together.

There’s still a lot that needs to be done, but for now, I’m happy to share with you the completion of Phase 1 of our Landscape Makeover.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

This is what our house looked like when we first bought it.  I don’t think we had even moved in yet.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

One of the first orders of business when we moved in was to change out the old windows for new energy efficient windows.  After that was done, we set about to paint the exterior a charcoal gray to modernize it a bit more.  Like I said, Mr. M and I are not green thumbs, so we had to hire in professionals to help us achieve the landscape design and do the work this place desperately needed.  I had a few ideas of my own, but our landscape designer really helped me focus in on a vision I was comfortable with.  He suggested plants that worked well with my concept.  Plus, he and his team pulled up all the weeds and dead plants and just did a major overhaul on the land.  They were fantastic!

(Apologies for the “Now” photo above… I didn’t do much staging before taking the photo, so eager I was to just snap away.  The gray hose didn’t stay, of course; and the Japanese maple was pulled up from our yard.  We’re planning to give it to my husband’s family as this maple no longer makes sense in the new design.)

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

Here’s the house from the street view.  I was quite set on tearing out the boxwood hedges when we first moved in, in lieu of modern horizontal wood fencing.  I changed my mind when I saw how much our house expenses were adding up.  These hedges are in fantastic shape and great to have around for Christmas decor in the home.  With a bit of trimming, they looked sleek and modern enough in no time.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

I wanted to create a flower bed in front of the hedges, but did not know which flowers were best.  I thought maybe tulips would look good there as they’re annuals and would come back every year, but my designer pointed out that the problem with planting flowers in the front is that people will pick them.  It was his idea to plant black mondo grass in front of the hedges, which would provide year round foliage and create a nice contrasting color against the green hedges.  He was completely aware of my love for ornamental grasses so this was a perfect suggestion!  He then added the variegated hosta to go between the hedge and the black mondo for more layers of color and dimension.  The hosta dies in the winter, but they are very hardy plants and do well with low maintenance.  At the time of planting, he added the chartreuse colored ground cover called baby’s tears (those tiny patches of yellow between the hostas and the black mondo), which will eventually spread around the plants and cover the bed.  I’m really looking forward to that!

When my designer painted the picture (figuratively speaking) of the rows of black grass against a row of white/green plant against the row of evergreen boxwood, I was 100% sold.  This conversation fueled my concept to make our landscape very sleek, very modern, very architectural.  I wanted color blocks of plants in neat rows.  I saw plants in lime greens, chartreuse, white, and black; in layers, in grasses, in neatly trimmed bushes.  I wanted to do away with all the plants that read too cottage-y or fussy.  It was time to tear everything out that didn’t fit the concept.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

The pathway to our front door was narrow with overgrown heather and lavender bushes, and a cedar tree that had gotten quite fat.

The redesign pared everything back and now we have a wider path to walk along.  The landscape lights actually light the path and no longer hidden behind bushy plants.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

This is a side view of that same path.  Our designer trimmed the lower branches of the cedar tree and moved the blue hostas that were located at our front window (in the first photo above) to under this tree.  The blue hostas are shade loving trees and are doing very well under there!  The bamboo plant to the right of the tree was cut back quite a bit.  Now it’s no longer so invasive looking.  I can’t wait for our new hebe bushes in the front to mature and fill the space a bit more!

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

Here’s another view of the same path going towards the street.  The “Keep Closed” sign on the gate was stenciled in by me last summer.  The occasional mailman still leaves that gate open.  Some people just don’t follow directions very well!

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

This is the bed under our front window.  The bamboo plants were transplanted to the bed in the backyard, while the blue hostas were moved to a new home under the cedar tree just off the front path (photos above).  In their places, my designer planted Choisya Sundance bushes.  These will grow to a medium height and get quite full.  I like their ombre effect in coloring ranging from the darker green at the bottom to the yellow-green at the top.  That hideous bamboo screen covering the basement window is only temporary as we have tenants who rent out the basement unit downstairs and they need some sort of privacy screening.  I have a new screen in mind for this space that I’m really excited about!  I can’t wait to make it and share it with you!

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

Back to the front path… this leads to the back yard.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

This is what our backyard looked like when we moved in.  Yes, that’s a hot tub on the deck in the center.  We actually want to get rid of it, so if anyone in Vancouver is reading this and wants this hot tub, message me!  We are not a hot tub using household (I can’t sit still in a tub of water for too long and I’m not sure of Mr. M’s reason).  I would much rather use that deck for an outdoor dining space.  I think we’d get more use out of that.

The backyard was abundant with THREE fig trees!  You can see one of them off to the right of the photo by the fence.  We had to make the decision to cut down two of them because the two by the fence were growing into our neighbor’s deck, quite substantially.  It was either spend $300 to cut them both down now or $150 to prune them every year.  Seeing as we would still have one more fruit bearing fig tree, we chose to cut these two down.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

After cutting down the fig trees, we had a lot more sun in the backyard, but were left with this bare fence.  Again, with neglect, weeds had quickly taken the place of the trees.  I wanted to get rid of the bamboo trees in the front yard and thought they might look good back here.  Our designer agreed and transplanted them like this.  They even pulled rocks from around the yards to create this border.  I think it makes a rather lovely backdrop for entertaining in this area.  I might want to hang up some colorful artwork between the bamboo plants.  That would be really fun, don’t you think?

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

That back area behind the hot tub was probably very lovely once upon a time, but all the plants had somehow stayed thriving through the overgrowth of weeds.  It had become a wilderness back there.  I didn’t even know those two trees by the fence were flowering magnolia trees!

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

We cleared out that back area, saved the plants that could be saved, and moved the magnolia trees so they now frame the hot tub deck.  When they get bigger and taller, they’ll arch over the top of the decking very nicely.

Landscape Makeover | Redesigned by M

That back area was cleared out entirely to make room for a vegetable garden!  With full sun in the back there, it makes a perfect place to grow veggies.  You can already see where we started building the raised beds (on the left side of the photo).  I’ll post how to build these beds in my next post, so stay tuned!

So that’s Phase 1.  It feels so good to have this part done!  Did you enjoy this tour?  The next phase will include hard surfaces, namely making over that path.  I’ve already got an idea for what I want to do there!  When we get rid of the hot tub, I’ll be able to move our outdoor dining space to the deck, which means I can turn our current outdoor dining space into a fire pit or something fun like that.  We might get rid of all the grass in the backyard, although we’re not sure what to replace it with just yet.  Until we make some decisions for Phase 2, I’ve got a window screen to make, some artwork for the fence behind the bamboo, vegetable gardens to grow, and the front porch to make pretty.  That’s still a ton of work before the next phase!  I wonder how our curb appeal would appraise now…?

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